//
you're reading...
Getting the message across

So little space

We live in a hyper-connected, info-flooded world.  This is no secret.

We have limited space in our brains to take in all the information and connections available to us.  This is also no secret.

Limited brain space affects the speaker (or writer) as much as the audience.  The onus is on the receiver to decide what is worthy of their attention.  The onus is on the speaker to create content worthy of that attention. This doesn’t mean making packing as much valuable content in as little space as possible.  It does mean being very selective of what content we do give at any one point in time, and then ruthlessly editing it down until our message comes across clearly, plainly, and memorably.

This hit home today while I was prepping a new set of business cards.  There’s so much I want to say about myself and my business, and so very little space in which to do it.  Someone needs to pick up the card, have something about it stick in their brain, and then remember my name and one contact method.  That’s a tall order for a piece of paper that usually gets a glimpse less than one second long.  I’ve got six lines, each less than three inches wide. It isn’t much, so I need to decide what’s important and what’s important has changed.  Email, telephone, and website obviously get some real estate.  Do I need to give a physical address?  Not really – people are going to email or call before they send a letter.  How about my Twitter handle?  Something that last year earned my derision has proven its usefulness to me and I deemed it worthy of a line.  My father would cringe that I would add such a thing, but my business world is very different than his.

Six lines, each less than three inches wide.  That’s not a lot of room.  Neither is two minutes for an elevator pitch, or ten minutes for a business presentation, or an hour for an educational lecture.  Decide your most important point, write down everything that you want to say, and then ruthlessly hack back anything that doesn’t support or drive that #1 point home.   Our jam-packed brains will thank you for it.

Advertisements

About Lauren Sergy

Lauren is a public speaking and communication coach and professional loudmouth. She is the owner of Up Front Communications, a coaching and consulting service dedicated to empowering people and businesses through the art of communication.

Discussion

No comments yet.

Reply to this post

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Up Front Communication

Up Front Communication delivers high-impact training in key communication skills such as public speaking, persuasion, and presentation delivery. Let experienced speaker and trainer Lauren Sergy help you and your employees better your communication skills through challenging and entertaining one-one-one coaching and group workshops.

Follow me on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: